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  1. Yesterday
  2. I have a couple animal bases for sale! They come with a layered PSD so they can easily be edited The working size is 500x500 asking $25 each Paypal Only I have a Humming bird, bear and racoon available. More may be added later. thanks for looking!
  3. Last week
  4. Thanks for the interest! The gameplay loop will be you assembling a team of 3 pets, and exploring different areas of the world. It will be a tactical RPG where each pet will have a unique set of abilities and elemental rock-paper-scissors style fighting. Still doing a lot of planning in this area, so it is not fully defined, and just getting back to it after a few months hiatus. The end turn button is also a placeholder in the gameplay image.
  5. This looks interesting from the screenshot. Mind telling us a bit more about the gameplay?
  6. My husband and I have been working on a new pet game called Abyssia (url: https://www.abyssia.app/) for the past year or so. It is not currently open to the public (although you can create an account), but hopefully within the next couple of months the gameplay will be live! It will have a heavy focus on battling and collecting the creatures known as abyssians in a post-apocalyptic world.
  7. Currently lurking; please use email or Discord to contact me.

  8. Looking for some feedback on a Minigame I'm working on. Here it is. Main this is a possible control scheme for this. The buttons at the button don't work (yet?), but I'm not even sure that's the right way to go for something like this. Meanwhile, if you're on Desktop you something similar you can use the arrow keys to get around. Meanwhile I might work on some graphics.
  9. Hello Hello! Solpets is currently looking for item and wearable artist! i've edited the above post to include our wearable style that we are looking for. if interested please feel free to contact us! you can message us on discord too!
  10. Yeah, it's planned. I'm busy with college and my own sites lately though, so this takes low priority.
  11. Will this be updated to PHP 7.3 at some point? My development environment uses 7.2, and my hosting uses 7.3 so I'm hoping this will be updated so I can finally try Mysidia again.
  12. My game Dragon Lord is a very niche text based PBBG so it's not very active. I get a few players every now and then, but text based games are a thing of the past. I created it years ago to learn PHP, and it runs on shared hosting so cost is very minimal. I make no money and keep it online because I still enjoy running it and interacting with the occasional refugee that wanders in to give it a try. I use Google Adsense, but other than that, there is no cash shop or way to make money at the moment. I feel like I don't have anything to offer that's worth charging people for. When I do get time to invest in more assets and features, that might change. I'm not after making a profit, it's purely a labor of love for the time being.
  13. I had trouble with that part because of the caching issues, but managed to figure it out! I'm glad this helps, you're welcome! There is a specific palette for Warrenz because we use modulation a lot. Other sites may not need that if they do hex edits instead. I would pick a color that looks best on the animal for the 'standard' color and then modify it for non-standard animals. We chose that specific shade of brown for the file, but then we have a brightness and saturation modulator on the realistic colors.
  14. Earlier
  15. @Hare Is there a specific palette that artists should use when creating the different layers and bases? I noticed you use a tan color in some layers, any advice on that.
  16. The storing images is something I struggled with and eventually gave up on (and stopped trying to use imagick) so thank you so, so much for explaining it! Awesome walk-through!
  17. Our demo is now available! Head on over to Lorwolf.com/demo and create your ideal wolf! How it Works Lorwolf is supported on desktop, tablet, and mobile devices, so feel free to use whichever you prefer. The first step is to choose a Breed (right now only Lupin, Jocol, and Kit are available). From there, you can customize your wolf’s gender, age, and appearance. For a little creative jumpstart, click “Randomize,” which will assign a random choice to all of the options. Once you are happy with your creation, hit Save Image! Sharing Your Wolves Help us see your beautiful wolves by tagging #Lorwolf on social media. You can also join in the conversation on Discord where we will host a wolf-share channel. Bugs and Questions We are hoping to squash any bugs that might appear in this demo before our alpha release. If you see any bugs, such as missing layers, leaky colors, phantom accents, broken links, etc. or have any questions, please send an email to lorwolfofficial@gmail.com or post on our bug-reports Discord channel. Moonsblessings, we hope you enjoy the demo!
  18. Hello all! I am on the hunt for a dev to integrate iFrames to CE's competition feature (during show entry) and Beauty Contest feature (during voting) to cut down on scrolling and improve the user experience. Feel free to reach out via Discord (Mae#0107) or send a PM here if you are interested in taking on this task!
  19. Let's make your game lore jump up and GRAB your players right in the imagination. I'm a professional copywriter with 15 years' experience writing for websites, newspapers, magazines, travel guides, e-books, email marketing and so much more. Storytelling with emotion is what I do best. Your players should do more than play - they should laugh! Cry! Immerse themselves in the world you've worked so hard to create! I can help that happen. Let's work together. Reply here or hit me up on Discord: Cactus#6673
  20. You're welcome and I'm glad you've found it helpful!
  21. This is so informative and interesting! Thank you so much for sharing these! I cant wait to try these methods out!
  22. Added sections for transparency, gradients, fractals, and storing images. All done with the Imagick tutorials!
  23. Howdy. Made a general creative thread on the last two boards I roamed. One shut down and the other is near-dead, so why not make a new home here? The main concept is something of a sim game, after all. First up -- Critters! -- and the old Title/Logo. Originally this was supposed to be a Fantasy World and the pets looked like animals. When I decided to set the concept in the not-so-distant past I struggled with how animals would work in this type of setting. One concept was having players have an Anthro-like Avatar and the Animal-creatures be Tamagotchi-like Digital Pets within the game world that took over the automated functions of running your store. Still struggled with making NPCs and Animals look like they're from the same world. Then, I happened to get inspiration from a random Youtube recommended video. If the game was going to be set in the not-so-distant past why not go for that look? After a round of critical research a handful of series were used as inspiration for the new looks. Cat-Dragon got less busy over time Ghost-Dog originally based off a dog that crossed a certain Technicolor Bridge in 2015. It's still a ghost, but less wolf-like and with fluffy wisps Bird was the hardest concept to nail. Had many more sketches than this. Originally a Chicken-Phoenix, it became a Dodo-Angel Mouse-Fairy, meanwhile, was the easiest. This is also the species I drew the most art and variants of A horse-manticore, of course. Thought it looked too busy so did away with the griffon-features and made it more lion-like Pig-vampire was another easy concept. Feathery wings became batty Concept's old name and logos. I drew #1 but thought it looked too busy. Commissioned #2, but think I wasted money in retrospect
  24. Added tutorials for mendelian genetics, color swapping, cutting out markings, and marking variation. Will add more soon.
  25. STORING IMAGES - When to Render Rendering images with Imagick is easy, but it takes a while to process each time you view the pet that's being rendered. If you want players to see images instantly without having to render them each time, you can store them in a file directory. First, you'll need something to name the file. We can use the pet's unique ID for this. Put the ID variable in your display code (wherever the image will be displayed) so you can pass it to your Imagick file (img.php). <?php echo "<img src='img.php?petid=$petid'>"; ?> Now pass the GET variable to Imagick so you'll have the pet ID in your Imagick code. You'll also add a new section to your Imagick code near the end. We'll use an if statement to check if a pet with this ID has an image file already (if not, it will write a new one). <?php $path = "./img/"; $petid = $_GET["petid"]; $img = new Imagick( $path . "/base.png" ); $imgdetails = new Imagick( $path . "details.png" ); $img->compositeImage($imgdetails, Imagick::COMPOSITE_DEFAULT, 0, 0); $imgeye = new Imagick( $path . "eye.png" ); $img->compositeImage($imgeye, Imagick::COMPOSITE_DEFAULT, 0, 0); $imgpupil = new Imagick( $path . "pupil.png" ); $img->compositeImage($imgpupil, Imagick::COMPOSITE_DEFAULT, 0, 0); $imgshading = new Imagick( $path . "shading.png" ); $img->compositeImage($imgshading, Imagick::COMPOSITE_MULTIPLY, 0, 0); $imglines = new Imagick( $path . "lines.png" ); $img->compositeImage($imglines, Imagick::COMPOSITE_DEFAULT, 0, 0); $imgwatermark = new Imagick( $path . "watermark.png" ); $img->compositeImage($imgwatermark, Imagick::COMPOSITE_DEFAULT, 0, 0); if (!file_exists('img/pets/' . $petid . '.png')) { $storepath = $path . 'pets/' . $petid . '.png'; $img->writeImage($storepath); } header('Content-type: image/png'); echo $img; ?> Presto! There should now be a new file called 5.png in the img/pets directory. Now let's update your display code so it displays either the Imagick code OR the stored image based on whether the stored image is available. if (file_exists('img/pets/' . $petid . '.png')) { echo "<img src='/img/pets/$petid.png'>"; } else { echo "<img src='img.php?petid=$petid'>"; } If the file exists, bring up the image file for the pet. If the file does not exist, use Imagick to render one. When a pet's image is going to be changed, you can simply wipe their current image file. <?php unlink('img/pets/' . $petid . '.png'); ?> Then the next time the player looks at the pet, the image display code will handle things (since it's set up to check if the file exists). Image Manipulation Explots If you store the files like this, you'll need to make sure players can't cheat the system to write files for their pets. This is beyond my Imagick tutorial, but just a heads up. CACHING - Images Not Appearing 'Updated' Another important note is that if file names for a pet don't change even though the file was rewritten, some browsers will cache the old image, resulting in a player not seeing the changes they made to their pet. You can get around this by putting a timestamp in the image filename. The timestamp will have to be checked and updated appropriately.
  26. TRANSPARENCY - Another Way to Add Variation If you want to add even more color opportunities to your creatures, one thing you can do is change the level of transparency on a marking layer. Let's change the transparency of the agouti layer that is composited over the black base layer. <?php $path = "./img/"; $img = new Imagick( $path . "/base.png" ); $imgagouti = new Imagick( $path . "agouti.png" ); $imgagouti->evaluateImage(Imagick::EVALUATE_MULTIPLY, 0.5, Imagick::CHANNEL_ALPHA); $img->compositeImage($imgagouti, Imagick::COMPOSITE_DEFAULT, 0, 0); $imgdetails = new Imagick( $path . "details.png" ); $img->compositeImage($imgdetails, Imagick::COMPOSITE_DEFAULT, 0, 0); $imgeye = new Imagick( $path . "eye.png" ); $img->compositeImage($imgeye, Imagick::COMPOSITE_DEFAULT, 0, 0); $imgpupil = new Imagick( $path . "pupil.png" ); $img->compositeImage($imgpupil, Imagick::COMPOSITE_DEFAULT, 0, 0); $imgshading = new Imagick( $path . "shading.png" ); $img->compositeImage($imgshading, Imagick::COMPOSITE_MULTIPLY, 0, 0); $imglines = new Imagick( $path . "lines.png" ); $img->compositeImage($imglines, Imagick::COMPOSITE_DEFAULT, 0, 0); $imgwatermark = new Imagick( $path . "watermark.png" ); $img->compositeImage($imgwatermark, Imagick::COMPOSITE_DEFAULT, 0, 0); header('Content-type: image/png'); echo $img; ?> Now we have the agouti layer set to 50% its normal opacity, allowing for the black base to show through 50% more and resulting in a darker colored rabbit. You can still see the agouti layer, but it's half as strong. You can adjust this to whatever you want by editing the 0.5 to another number. GRADIENTS - Adding More Color You can also add gradients with Imagick using the newPseudoImage function. <?php $path = "./img/"; $img = new Imagick( $path . "/base.png" ); $gradient = new Imagick(); $gradient->newPseudoImage(400, 400, 'gradient:rgba(255,0,0)-none'); $img->compositeImage($gradient, Imagick::COMPOSITE_ATOP, 0, 0); $imgdetails = new Imagick( $path . "details.png" ); $img->compositeImage($imgdetails, Imagick::COMPOSITE_DEFAULT, 0, 0); $imgeye = new Imagick( $path . "eye.png" ); $img->compositeImage($imgeye, Imagick::COMPOSITE_DEFAULT, 0, 0); $imgpupil = new Imagick( $path . "pupil.png" ); $img->compositeImage($imgpupil, Imagick::COMPOSITE_DEFAULT, 0, 0); $imgshading = new Imagick( $path . "shading.png" ); $img->compositeImage($imgshading, Imagick::COMPOSITE_MULTIPLY, 0, 0); $imglines = new Imagick( $path . "lines.png" ); $img->compositeImage($imglines, Imagick::COMPOSITE_DEFAULT, 0, 0); $imgwatermark = new Imagick( $path . "watermark.png" ); $img->compositeImage($imgwatermark, Imagick::COMPOSITE_DEFAULT, 0, 0); header('Content-type: image/png'); echo $img; ?> Now we have a black rabbit with a red vertical gradient. Change the RBG value to whatever color you want for the gradient part. We can also add the agouti layer (as you can see, it works with markings) and have the gradient go over or under the marking depending on the order we composite the layers. Above image has no agouti marking. Above image has the agouti marking underneathe the gradient. Above image has the agouti marking above the gradient. You can also do other types of gradients such as radial with radial-gradient:rgba(255,0,0)-none. FRACTALS - Adding Even More Color You can do a lot of other nifty stuff with newPseudoImage such as fractals. <?php $path = "./img/"; $img = new Imagick( $path . "/base.png" ); $imgfractal = new Imagick(); $imgfractal->newPseudoImage(400,400, "plasma:fractal "); $img->compositeImage($imgfractal, Imagick::COMPOSITE_ATOP, 0, 0); $imgdetails = new Imagick( $path . "details.png" ); $img->compositeImage($imgdetails, Imagick::COMPOSITE_DEFAULT, 0, 0); $imgeye = new Imagick( $path . "eye.png" ); $img->compositeImage($imgeye, Imagick::COMPOSITE_DEFAULT, 0, 0); $imgpupil = new Imagick( $path . "pupil.png" ); $img->compositeImage($imgpupil, Imagick::COMPOSITE_DEFAULT, 0, 0); $imgshading = new Imagick( $path . "shading.png" ); $img->compositeImage($imgshading, Imagick::COMPOSITE_MULTIPLY, 0, 0); $imglines = new Imagick( $path . "lines.png" ); $img->compositeImage($imglines, Imagick::COMPOSITE_DEFAULT, 0, 0); $imgwatermark = new Imagick( $path . "watermark.png" ); $img->compositeImage($imgwatermark, Imagick::COMPOSITE_DEFAULT, 0, 0); header('Content-type: image/png'); echo $img; ?> Now we have fancy randomly generated colors.
  27. SPOTS - Cutouts & Variations What if you want to make a spotted animal, like this English Spot rabbit? You could draw spots on, but what if you want the spots to be the color of the animal's genotype (minus spotted factor)? AND you want variation for the spots? Step One - Prepare Layers For these layers, we'll draw where we want the spots to go. We'll have two different variations, spots0.png and spots1.png. Step Two - Add One Now let's add the spots0.png layer. If you read the tutorial above, you'll see that we created a solid white rabbit (albino) by adding a copy of the base layer that goes over the other markings. We're going to reuse this white layer for the English rabbits by cutting spots out of it. <?php $path = "./img/"; $img = new Imagick( $path . "/base.png" ); $imgalbino = new Imagick( $path . "base.png" ); $clut = new Imagick(); $clut->newImage(1, 1, new ImagickPixel('#FFF')); $imgalbino->clutImage($clut); $clut->destroy(); $imgspots = new Imagick( $path . "/spots0.png" ); $imgalbino->compositeImage($imgspots, Imagick::COMPOSITE_DSTOUT, 0, 0); $img->compositeImage($imgalbino, Imagick::COMPOSITE_DEFAULT, 0, 0); $imgdetails = new Imagick( $path . "details.png" ); $img->compositeImage($imgdetails, Imagick::COMPOSITE_DEFAULT, 0, 0); $imgeye = new Imagick( $path . "eye.png" ); $img->compositeImage($imgeye, Imagick::COMPOSITE_DEFAULT, 0, 0); $imgpupil = new Imagick( $path . "pupil.png" ); $img->compositeImage($imgpupil, Imagick::COMPOSITE_DEFAULT, 0, 0); $imgshading = new Imagick( $path . "shading.png" ); $img->compositeImage($imgshading, Imagick::COMPOSITE_MULTIPLY, 0, 0); $imglines = new Imagick( $path . "lines.png" ); $img->compositeImage($imglines, Imagick::COMPOSITE_DEFAULT, 0, 0); $imgwatermark = new Imagick( $path . "watermark.png" ); $img->compositeImage($imgwatermark, Imagick::COMPOSITE_DEFAULT, 0, 0); header('Content-type: image/png'); echo $img; ?> The spots layer composites over the albino layer with COMPOSITE_DSTOUT instead of COMPOSITE_DEFAULT, causing the spots to be cut out of the albino layer. We then composite the resulting 'updated' albino layer (with the spots cut out) onto the $img. Thus, we now have an English Spot: If we add the marking layers in, we can get any color to show where the spots are. Not just black spots. Step Three - Add Variation Variable Add a variable to the scripts like we did with genetics in the above tutoorial. <?php echo "<img src='img.php?spotnum=$spotnum'>"; ?> $spotnum will either be 0 or 1, which is in the filename for the spots. Now add the GET variable to your Imagick script like we did above. <?php $path = "./img/"; $spotnum = $_GET["spotnum"]; $img = new Imagick( $path . "/base.png" ); $imgalbino = new Imagick( $path . "base.png" ); $clut = new Imagick(); $clut->newImage(1, 1, new ImagickPixel('#FFF')); $imgalbino->clutImage($clut); $clut->destroy(); $imgspots = new Imagick( $path . "/spots" . $spotnum . ".png" ); $imgalbino->compositeImage($imgspots, Imagick::COMPOSITE_DSTOUT, 0, 0); $img->compositeImage($imgalbino, Imagick::COMPOSITE_DEFAULT, 0, 0); $imgdetails = new Imagick( $path . "details.png" ); $img->compositeImage($imgdetails, Imagick::COMPOSITE_DEFAULT, 0, 0); $imgeye = new Imagick( $path . "eye.png" ); $img->compositeImage($imgeye, Imagick::COMPOSITE_DEFAULT, 0, 0); $imgpupil = new Imagick( $path . "pupil.png" ); $img->compositeImage($imgpupil, Imagick::COMPOSITE_DEFAULT, 0, 0); $imgshading = new Imagick( $path . "shading.png" ); $img->compositeImage($imgshading, Imagick::COMPOSITE_MULTIPLY, 0, 0); $imglines = new Imagick( $path . "lines.png" ); $img->compositeImage($imglines, Imagick::COMPOSITE_DEFAULT, 0, 0); $imgwatermark = new Imagick( $path . "watermark.png" ); $img->compositeImage($imgwatermark, Imagick::COMPOSITE_DEFAULT, 0, 0); header('Content-type: image/png'); echo $img; ?> And now we get both variations depending on what number the animal has in their data.
  28. COLORING & MARKINGS - Mendelian Genetics There's a lot of ways you can handle markings and layers. We include semi-realistic Mendelian genetics on Warrenz, so I'll go over how to handle three different gene expressions in this part. I'm using rabbits as an example, but you can apply the same coding concepts to different species even though they have different genetics. TURNING LAYERS OFF AND ON We'll start with the basics, using the A Locus to turn layers off and on in a way that mimics real life. There's more to the genotype than just the A locus, but you don't need the entire genotype for a working code. You can add other genes later. Here' a real life agouti rabbit. ANd here's a tan pattern (same genotype aside from the A locus). And again, same genotype on this one except he's a self (A locus). So self has no markings, tan has just the cream underbelly, and agouti has cream underbelly and an additional brown layer. Let's do it! Step One In order to tell the program which genes your animal has, you need to pass the variables into your Imagick script. This can be done with $_GET. Edit your profile.php (or whenever you're displaying the image) to include the locus variable. <?php echo "<img src='img.php?alocus=$alocus'>"; ?> The $alocus variable will need to be assigned of course. I'm not going to go over scripts for genetics in this tutorial, just the Imagick parts, so I'm assuming you already have a method telling the locus what to be. In this case, it will ether be agouti, tan, or self. Step Two So back to the Imagick script, add the variable for the locus and then add some if statements to make that locus determine which layers get turned on. <?php $path = "./img/"; $alocus = $_GET["alocus"]; $img = new Imagick( $path . "/base.png" ); if ($alocus == 'agouti') { $imgagouti = new Imagick( $path . "agouti.png" ); $img->compositeImage($imgagouti, Imagick::COMPOSITE_DEFAULT, 0, 0); } if ($alocus == 'agouti' or $alocus == 'tan') { $imgotter = new Imagick( $path . "otter.png" ); $img->compositeImage($imgotter, Imagick::COMPOSITE_DEFAULT, 0, 0); } $imgdetails = new Imagick( $path . "details.png" ); $img->compositeImage($imgdetails, Imagick::COMPOSITE_DEFAULT, 0, 0); $imgeye = new Imagick( $path . "eye.png" ); $img->compositeImage($imgeye, Imagick::COMPOSITE_DEFAULT, 0, 0); $imgpupil = new Imagick( $path . "pupil.png" ); $img->compositeImage($imgpupil, Imagick::COMPOSITE_DEFAULT, 0, 0); $imgshading = new Imagick( $path . "shading.png" ); $img->compositeImage($imgshading, Imagick::COMPOSITE_MULTIPLY, 0, 0); $imglines = new Imagick( $path . "lines.png" ); $img->compositeImage($imglines, Imagick::COMPOSITE_DEFAULT, 0, 0); $imgwatermark = new Imagick( $path . "watermark.png" ); $img->compositeImage($imgwatermark, Imagick::COMPOSITE_DEFAULT, 0, 0); header('Content-type: image/png'); echo $img; ?> Bam! Now we have a dynamic rabbit that can be either agouti, tan, or self depending on the A locus. If $alocus is self (or not specificied at all), neither marking layers will show, resulting in a self colored rabbit. If $alocus is tan, we'll get the otter layer added. And if $alocus is agout, we'll get a rabbit with both otter and agouti layers active, resulting in a true agouti color. ALBINISM - Color Change & Adding Another Locus What if we wanted to make an albino? In real life, albinism is like a white sheet masking the rabbit's true color underneathe, so I like to do the same thing with Imagick (it's easier than trying to turn every layer white). Albinism is controlled in the C locus for rabbits, so here's how to add another locus. Add it to the image display file like we did before. Separate it from the previous one with an & symbol. You can continue to add as many more variables as you want layer using & symbols like this. <?php echo "<img src='img.php?alocus=$alocus&clocus=$clocus'>"; ?> Now, add the new variable to the Imagick file. We're also going to add a new layer right under the eye layer, and above the highest possible marking. This is a copy of the base layer, but we're turning it white so it goes over all the furry parts. The white layer will be activated if the C locus is set to albino. We are also going to add a color change to the eye and pupil layers if C locus is albino, creating red eyes. <?php $path = "./img/"; $alocus = $_GET["alocus"]; $clocus = $_GET["clocus"]; $img = new Imagick( $path . "/base.png" ); if ($alocus == 'agouti') { $imgagouti = new Imagick( $path . "agouti.png" ); $img->compositeImage($imgagouti, Imagick::COMPOSITE_DEFAULT, 0, 0); } if ($alocus == 'agouti' or $alocus == 'tan') { $imgotter = new Imagick( $path . "otter.png" ); $img->compositeImage($imgotter, Imagick::COMPOSITE_DEFAULT, 0, 0); } if ($clocus == 'albino') { $imgalbino = new Imagick( $path . "base.png" ); $clut = new Imagick(); $clut->newImage(1, 1, new ImagickPixel('#FFF')); $imgalbino->clutImage($clut); $clut->destroy(); $img->compositeImage($imgalbino, Imagick::COMPOSITE_DEFAULT, 0, 0); } $imgdetails = new Imagick( $path . "details.png" ); $img->compositeImage($imgdetails, Imagick::COMPOSITE_DEFAULT, 0, 0); $imgeye = new Imagick( $path . "eye.png" ); if ($clocus == 'albino') { $imgeye->modulateImage(150, 100, 80); } $img->compositeImage($imgeye, Imagick::COMPOSITE_DEFAULT, 0, 0); $imgpupil = new Imagick( $path . "pupil.png" ); if ($clocus == 'albino') { $clut = new Imagick(); $clut->newImage(1, 1, new ImagickPixel('#811f32')); $imgpupil->clutImage($clut); $clut->destroy(); } $img->compositeImage($imgpupil, Imagick::COMPOSITE_DEFAULT, 0, 0); $imgshading = new Imagick( $path . "shading.png" ); $img->compositeImage($imgshading, Imagick::COMPOSITE_MULTIPLY, 0, 0); $imglines = new Imagick( $path . "lines.png" ); $img->compositeImage($imglines, Imagick::COMPOSITE_DEFAULT, 0, 0); $imgwatermark = new Imagick( $path . "watermark.png" ); $img->compositeImage($imgwatermark, Imagick::COMPOSITE_DEFAULT, 0, 0); header('Content-type: image/png'); echo $img; ?> And now we have an albino rabbit. Recoloring Options This shows two different options for recoloring your image layers. 1. Change hex with clut like we did to turn the base layer white and the pupil pink. This forces the hex value over the entirety of the layer, as opposed to modulation which simply adjusts the color, so the whole layer will be one color (works fine if you don't want to retain multiple colors or shades in a single layer). 2. Modulation, as used on the eye layer to retain the shading we have inside the eye layer itself. We don't want these all turning into one color. Since we use modulation for the eyes though, we do need to make sure every bunny on the site has the same hex values used in the artwork files for the eyes (otherwise the modulator would cause inconsistent colors). You don't have to worry about inconsistent colors when forcing hexes using clut, so that's a tradeoff I've found. Here's a picture showing off the eye layer without the modulation (the way it is in the source file), and with modulation to turn it pink with albinism. There you have those. Those are some of the basics for adding markings and adjusting colors. You can see how variables are passed into Imagick from an outside script, and how to manipulate layers using those variables. This can be expanded into the rest of your script for a more fleshed out system (and you don't need to use it strictly for genotypes, you can also just make a variable for tiger stripes for example and have that in there instead). Note: I know the shading on the white rabbit is a little harsh here. It's just the file I'm using, sorry about that. I forgot to lower the opacity in the shading art file a bit for this tutorial.
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